Worst Dog Breeds For First-Time Dog Owners

Dogs are the most wonderful pets that anyone can have. But not every dog breed can be the perfect one for all. Every dog breed has its own personality and temper, which everyone can’t handle. There are no dog breeds that we can consider the worst. But depending on their handling difficulties, we can consider whether the dog breed is right for us or not. Especially when you own a dog for the first time, it’s best to go with an easy-to-handle dog breed rather than getting an angry or stubborn one. 

So if you are also going to own a dog breed for the first time, we suggest you cut down the aggressive dog breeds from your wishlist first. For that, let’s check out which dog breeds are the most aggressive ones and don’t suit first-time dog owners. 

1. Akita

Originating from Japan, Akitas are large, powerful dogs with alert working and guarding instincts. These dogs are silent hunters and used to hunt bears, boar, and elk. Weighing upwards of 115 pounds or more, these dog breeds will be challenging to train, and as a new dog owner, it will be best to avoid them. Also, their instant-changing nature makes it tough to predict what they are going to do next. One minute they are calm; the next, they are aggressive and bouncy. So, an experienced trainer is needed to control these heavy ones in the territory. 

Akita

2. Rottweiler

Rottweilers are extremely gentle giants when kept in experienced hands and supervision. But in the wrong hands, Rottweilers can be truly scary dogs and show extreme aggression towards their owners. Being large, these Rotties are extremely powerful and not easy to control. If you fail to take control of your rottweilers, they may show bossy behavior and take control of the house. So, having this large bossy dog for a new pet owner will be very difficult. 

Rottweiler
Rottweiler

3. Australian Cattle Dog

Australian Cattle Dog, also known as Blue Heeler or Australian Heeler, has a reputation for being extremely stubborn and energetic dog. Being adventurous spirits and having belief in their own invincibility, these Blue Heelers will injure themself frequently. Their extreme love and loyalty for their owners may also injure strangers without any reason. Also, while being home, they need a lot of exercise to be happy and stress-free, which can be troublesome for brand-new owners. 

Australian Cattle Dog

4. Chow Chow

Despite having a teddy-like appearance, Chow Chow may not be the lovey-dovey dog you want. Chow Chow are notoriously aloof four-footers, and their disinterest in people or training makes them unsuitable for new dog owners. Also, their aggressive nature toward strangers and other dogs can create a big mess. Adding to that, the excessively large size of these dogs may be dangerous and frustrating too. 

Chow Chow
Chow Chow

5. Alaskan Malamute

Being the oldest and largest of Arctic Sled dogs, the Alaskan Malamute processes massive strength as well as endurance. Although they are not bred to race, they can carry large loads over a long distance. Made for traveling, Alaskan is an athletic and exuberant dog. Along with sledding and pulling weight, Alaskans also enjoy jogging, swimming, backpacking, and other physical activities. So they need a dedicated owner who can commit a lot of time to exercise Alaskans. Also, these heavy dogs shed notoriously, and their thick fur may also make them vulnerable to heat injuries. 

Alaskan Malamute

6. Dalmatian

These dog breeds became extremely popular among dog lovers after appearing in the Blockbuster Movie “101 Dalmatians”. But, sorry to say, this dog breed is not meant for being house pets. Instead, Dalmatians are bred to run barking ahead of fire engines. So they need a lot of energy release and can be quite barky. These Dalmatians may become destructive in a house if they don’t get mental stimulation or exercise. Even an experienced dog owner may snag while petting a Dalmatian. So, it’s best to avoid this dog breed for a house. 

Dalmatian
Dalmatian

7. Border Collie

Border collies are great working dogs and are bred for all-day farm work. Thus as a pet dog, it may need a lot of stimulation and exercise. Without having the needed exercise and stimulation, Colies get bored and unchallenged in houses and can start barking, digging, and even nipping at anything. So, if you are not able to give Border Collies a lot of mental and physical exercise, then it’s best to avoid this dog breed. 

Border Collie

8. Cane Corso

Originally bred in Italy as guard dogs or hunting dogs, Cane Corso won’t be the best suit for new pet owners. Their nature of protecting their owners may lead them to attack strangers and create a great mess for you. Also, their territorial habit may harden handling these large dogs in houses. With that, for having a stubborn nature and tendency to rule the home, Cane Corso doesn’t suit as a family dog. 

Cane Corso
Cane Corso

9. German Shepherd

Don’t be shocked to see a German Shepherd on the list. Of course, we all get inspired by seeing German Shepherds in the movies and series, as a part of military teams, and doing extraordinary work. But that only happened after training the dogs well. German Shepherds are indeed highly intelligent and natural protectors. But for a novice dog owner, it won’t be easy for you to train a German Shepherd for your everyday lifestyle. Also, these intelligent dogs come with serious health problems like- Hip dysplasia and neurologic issues.

German Shepherd
German Shepherd

10. Weimaraner

Weimaraner, also known as “Grey Ghost”, got its pet name for walking very close to its owners. Being extremely loyal, Weimaraners are highly intelligent dog breeds too. But these extremely energetic dog breeds come with a no “OFF Switch” and are not happy when left alone. Loneliness creates separation anxiety among Weimaraners, which will be a real issue for you. Also, this grey ghost is difficult to house and can be a hazard for cats and other small pets. 

Weimaraner
Weimaraner

Final Thoughts

That’s all with our list of Worst Dog Breeds for First-Time Dog Owners. Hope you find this article insightful and are not going to make the mistake of choosing the wrong dog for yourself. 

Murphy Bernier

Murphy Bernier

Murphy Bernier is a New-York based freelance writer, professional blogger and certified dog trainer. She networks shelter pets to help them find homes and volunteers for rescue groups as she is passionate about dog rescue and adoption. From a very early age, she developed extensive animal handling skills from her dad, and that’s where her love for animals started.

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